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Science K/3

Fluttering Off

Fluttering Off

Idea by Robin, Kindergarten Teacher, Ellenton, FL My students and I end our Kindergarten school year with a special unit on Monarch butterflies. We raise the caterpillars during our last month (or so) of school. We make predictions, observe, record our findings and keep a journal of the caterpillars’ metamorphosis. We then release the butterflies
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Science Experiment for Kids: Making Toothpaste

Science Experiment for Kids:  Making Toothpaste

February is National Children’s Dental Health Month and what better time to create some toothpaste in the classroom.  This easy science experiment is perfect for preschool and lower elementary grades.  It promotes dental health awareness while also getting students excited and thinking about science.


Bringing Science to Life by Creating a Classroom Aquarium

Bringing Science to Life by Creating a Classroom Aquarium

Are you searching for a way to end the school year with a big project that students will remember for years to come?  Try this hands-on science activity from Heather, a 5th Grade teacher, in Narvon, PA.  It is perfect for differentiated learning and gives students that hands-on, artistic aspect that helps them thrive. 


Weaving Earth Day Practices into Everyday Life

Weaving Earth Day Practices into Everyday Life

Idea by Sofia, a 3rd Grade Teacher, from Riverside, CA. I make a habit of incorporating ecological practices into the way I plan my classroom management strategies. I include practices aimed at energy conservation as well as waste reduction and present these as part of our daily routine. We only turn on one set of
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Books Can Pave the Way!

Books Can Pave the Way!

Idea by Tammy, a 1st Grade Teacher, in Lincoln Park, MI. As part of my effort to raise student awareness about the importance of caring for the Earth, I share classic books with an environmental message. I include titles, such as The Wump World by Bill Peet, (Sandpiper, 1981), The Berenstain Bears Don’t Pollute (Anymore)
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Small People Can Make a Big Difference

Small People Can Make a Big Difference

Idea by Ruby, a 1st Grade Teacher, in Hinesville, GA. I make certain my little first graders realize they can still make a big difference in protecting our environment. I always have one student helper responsible for turning out the classroom lights when we leave the room. Another student helper shuts down the classroom computers
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Candy Conservation

Candy Conservation

Idea by Katie, a 1st Grade Teacher, in Chalmette, LA. To help children understand that natural resources are limited, I explain that energy eventually will run out and we need to use what we have wisely. To demonstrate this concept, I buy a big bag of M&M candies and bring them to the class on
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Fantasy Island Fosters Awareness

Fantasy Island Fosters Awareness

Idea by Katie, a 3rd Grade Teacher, from McLean, VA. To help kids learn about the importance of energy conservation, I use a unit from Project Clarion (William & Mary College, School of Education) called “Dig It.” The unit helps kids learn about the difference between renewable and nonrenewable energy resources. It is a problem-based
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Literature-based Ecology

Literature-based Ecology

Idea by Mary, a 2nd Grade Teacher, in Benton, AR. This year, after we read the classic book, The Lorax by Dr. Seuss (Random House Books for Young Readers, 1971), I’ll have students read the new book, How to Help the Earth by the Lorax by Tish Rabe (Random House Books for Young Readers, 2012).
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Build Global Awareness

Build Global Awareness

Idea by Patrice, a 3rd Grade Teacher, in New Milford, CT. To begin a unit on water awareness, I have students toss an inflatable globe to one another. After each catch, we notice whether our thumbs grasped the land or the water; we tally each catch accordingly. (Water always wins because it covers more surface
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