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Teaching Bootcamp Week 3: Classroom Management Made Easy

Classroom Management refers to managing the systems and procedures in your class.  It is about having ways to deal with transition times and the way the classroom is run.  For any teacher this is a daunting task, but for new teachers, it can be downright scary.

In this week’s Teaching Bootcamp, we will be exploring ways to manage the classroom to ensure that you maintain a space where happy, engaged learners can thrive.  Our guest experts share their knowledge and encourage you to participate with them in the discussion about what constitutes great classroom management.  Teaching does not happen in a vacuum and neither does learning how to teach more effectively.

Ask questions this week, share your tips and tricks, and encourage one another.  Each comment that you leave on the blog is an entry into this week’s giveaway, but, more importantly, it may be just the comment that another teacher needs to read to be more successful.  On Friday, June 29th, 2012, we will choose one random comment left before 5pm EST on The Teachers’ Lounge blog to win a Classroom Management Pocket Chart.  Each comment, question, or insight that you share is an entry into this week’s contest.

Be sure to join us on Wednesday evening, June 27th, at 9pm EST for a live #TeachChat as we discuss Classroom Management.  We will also be announcing the winners in the 2012 Really Good Education Blog Awards during the chat.  It is a great time to chat with other teachers and get your questions and concerns answered right away.

A special congratulations to Carla C., the winner of last week’s Really Good Giveaway.


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17 comments
Mary S
Mary S

This would be helpful for putting children into cooperative learning groups, visually. It would help them move into the groups quickly.

anne
anne

I have a red, green, and yellow light system. This chart would make classroom management much easier!

Natalie
Natalie

In preschool, I have a quiet spot with pillows, stuffed animals, and small games. I have ways to calm down and the class rules posted in the spot as well. The student can freely go to this spot to calm their body down(they can also be prompted to go by the teacher). This can be modified for older students.

Natalie
Natalie

During the first week of school, create a list of rules that you agree upon as a class. Have each child sign their name or leave their fingerprint to show that they accept the rules.

Natalie
Natalie

In preschool, I ring a bell 5 minutes before a transition. Everyone stops and listens. When it is time to clean up, I ring the bell again, the children stop and listen, and I announce that it is time to clean up.

Natalie
Natalie

Similar to the idea above, use a color wheel. Create a large wheel with green, yellow and red (you could add orange or brown as additional warning colors if desired). Each child has a clothespin with their name or picture on it. Each day the class starts on green and they can change colors based on preset rules. You can set consequences for having to move your clip and for everyone staying on green. This method can also be reset mid day for younger children.

Natalie
Natalie

I like to use a pocket chart where each child has a slot with three colored cards. Everyone begins with green, after a set number of warning, they move to yellow with a set consequence, and lastly they can move to red if needed. For younger ones, you can reset everyone to green midday. You can also reward the whole class for staying on green with free play at the end of the day.

Linda
Linda

This would be great to use for morning check in and they can place weather they are having tray or lunch. It's also a way o doing attendance.

Gloria Wilson
Gloria Wilson

Using a chart like this will not only help with classroom management, but will help students to be held more accountable for those jobs.

Heather Bridges
Heather Bridges

I am going to be implementing Whole Brain Teaching this coming school year and this pocket chart would be great for classroom behavior cards!

Marianne Griffith
Marianne Griffith

I like this idea, but it wouldn't be practical for my mass art classes. I have 7 classes a day for Monday and Tuesday with the same kids. Then, on Wednesday and Friday I have 7 more daily classes with a whole new set of children. That's 250 kids per week. Does anyone have a magic system how to manage that many kids with that many classes in art? It just can't be individualized with any practicality with a pocket chart. Can you imagine, I would have to have 14 pocket charts? LOL

Mary
Mary

I am using this pocket chart as a library book sign-out. I put student numbers, rather than names, so I can use from year to year. I use small index cards so students can write the book(s) they have at their desks. I can check quickly to see what each student is reading (or if they are) during their free time. I am actually considering getting a second one to use for classroom management, as it was intended. Hmmm, it would be nice if I would win one! :)

Mary Ellen
Mary Ellen

This is an awesome system. I have used something similar in an elementary classroom with just numbers on the pockets instead of names for a bit of anonimity.

Katie Neustadter
Katie Neustadter

This chart would be awesome to have in my classroom. I have so many ideas I don't even know where to begin!

Courtney McDaniel
Courtney McDaniel

I teach three groups of fifth grade science. One of my clean up/transition tips is to play music. When they get their group cleaned up and are ready to line up, they can dance until the song is over. It's motivating to have them clean quickly so they can dance but also allows me to check each group that they have cleaned up properly.

Kassy
Kassy

I am looking for some new ideas for classroom management but was wondering if anyone had ever tried to use something like this in a middle school classroom instead of just an elementary room?

Brandi Jordan
Brandi Jordan

Hi Marianne! WOW! You have your hands full! My first thoughts are to use either a milk crate with hanging folders - one per class - and put a cushioned seat on top to make a useable stool with storage. Either that or a lidded file box with hanging folders would work, as well. It's a lot of file boxes and milk crates, but it could keep everything organized. Good luck! ~Brandi Managing Director of The Teachers' Lounge, a Really Good Stuff blog