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May 18, 2010

5 Clever Classroom Storage Ideas

Written By: Brandi Jordan
X Classroom Storage Ideas

Classroom Storage Ideas

When space is at a premium, making use of every available storage opportunity in the classroom is important. As your teaching supply collection grows and the number of students in your classroom increases due to budget cuts, finding clever storage solutions is even more important. The creative storage ideas below will help control the clutter chaos and help you organize your classroom in no time.

Classroom Storage Ideas

Tackle Box Organizer Storage

Looking for a clever way to store all of those science experiment pieces? With a simple fishing tackle box, you can store everything from bottle caps to tennis balls to paint chips so that you have them handy when science calls. Keep a collection of simple science activities on index cards and store them in the box. Whether you use it for every day science lessons, or a rainy day activity, the tackle box can be the perfect storage solution for experiment supplies.

 

Chair Storage

Make the most out of the back of your students’ chairs by hanging storage pockets on the back of them. This is especially helpful if you have tables in your classroom instead of desks. Each student can store his books, pencils and folders behind his chair for easy access and out of the way storage.

 

Hanging Pockets

Closet doors can have new life when you install hanging pocket organizers. Whether you are organizing small supplies, center activities or writing folders, there is a hanging pocket organizer for your every need. Remember, magnetic pocket organizers add extra versatility as they can also be hung on the side of metal filing cabinets.

 

Windowsill Flower Boxes

If the windowsill is too narrow for binders, magazine holders or bins, use narrow flower boxes instead. Typically more narrow than common storage containers, windowsill boxes can offer additional storage space. What to store in such a bin? The possibilities are endless! Create a windowsill library and place books inside them. Organize glue and art supplies by keeping them together in this portable art station. And science on the go has never been easier than when magnifying glasses, science journals and pencils are stored inside. The ideas are limited only by your own imagination!

 

Awesome Apron

Most teachers usually find themselves reaching for the same items multiple times each day. Pens, pencils, markers, and sticky notes are all common tools of the trade. Instead of worrying about where you can store these daily essentials, wear a half-apron to keep yourself organized and store the items in the apron’s pockets. Whether it is a simple two pocket apron or a fancy, handmade multi-pocket creation, aprons offer organization in a clever and unobtrusive way.

 

What is your favorite way to organize your classroom supplies? Share with us!

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  • Meaghan
    March 4, 2012

    I have a collection of magnetic chip bag clips (one for each block) that I have labelled and place on the far side of my chalkboard (or whiteboard). I love them. They are a perfect place for storing extra handouts. The students know to check the clip for their block when they’ve missed a day.

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  • Katrina
    October 31, 2011

    The chair pockets are a great idea especially when your students are at a table or don’t have a very big desk to store their books and supplies. Another storage idea is using baby wipe containers to store things like glue sticks or art supplies

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  • Sarah C
    March 20, 2011

    I like using the hanging pockets (double wide pocket chart) for make up work. Work the students need to complete is placed in their respective pocket and as they have some time throughout the week, they are to take out the work they have missed and complete it.

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  • Bruce
    May 22, 2010

    If you don’t have an apron, you can use a carpenter’s apron. These can be obtained at your local hardware store and sometimes you can get them for free, but you might have to put up with some advertising.

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  • Bruce
    May 21, 2010

    When it comes using money as a manipulative… the plastic, rectangular baby food containers are the perfect size to distribute a set amount of coins! In first grade, I use 4 quarters, 6 dimes, 6 nickels, and 10 pennies in each container. It works perfectly when we run our school grocery store (students bring in cardboard or plastic grocery items from home, I price them, students purchase by counting out the amount – then put it back and start over with another item! They LOVE it!)

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  • Stephanie
    May 20, 2010

    Some craft stores carry blank canvas “hardware” aprons and full size aprins…no logos and you can decorate it yourself with fabric paint pens, clutter, patches or fun buttons!

    Also, look for collapsible fabric cubes that can be used for supply storage, book bins, kid cubbies. The best part – they can be collapsed and stored flat when not in use!

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  • Sara Getting
    May 18, 2010

    When it comes using money as a manipulative… the plastic, rectangular baby food containers are the perfect size to distribute a set amount of coins! In first grade, I use 4 quarters, 6 dimes, 6 nickels, and 10 pennies in each container. It works perfectly when we run our school grocery store (students bring in cardboard or plastic grocery items from home, I price them, students purchase by counting out the amount – then put it back and start over with another item! They LOVE it!)

    Report
  • Judi Kelsey
    May 18, 2010

    If you don’t have an apron, you can use a carpenter’s apron. These can be obtained at your local hardware store and sometimes you can get them for free, but you might have to put up with some advertising.

    Report
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